Summer Math Fun

Summer fun has begun. The kids are livin’ it up at day camp running around like goblin sharks, covered head-to-toe in mineral sunscreen, we’re hitting up the pool every chance we get to hone in on those swimming skills, and we’re also enjoying our travels and making the most of our vacation days.

You know what else happens in the summer?

The inevitable regression in studies from the school year. Just this week, I asked my son to sit down and write a birthday card for his grandma. He was hesitant to spell words I know he knows, his handwriting was atrocious, and his concentration was well, a challenge.

Enter Big Catch, a fun division board game.logicroots-82

I love the company’s mission – to make practicing math fun, and a family activity. Logic Roots designs its’ games with the goal of generating 20 times more math practice than the classroom, based on the idea that more practice = better math.

The goal of the Big Catch game is to save the lost fishermen by using division skills.

I noticed as we played that the concept of dividing up the fish and getting a remainder made sense and could sink in and help younger kids as part of an introduction to division. Or as was also the case for us, it served as a great reminder and memory boost for 10-year-olds.

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The fishing/water theme of Big Catch is perfect too, as we’re about to head out for a week at the lake, with our new board game in tow.

Check out the other math games Logic Roots sells on Amazon – there are games for every stage of your child’s learning and development and grade level. And free colorful division worksheets that you can download too.

“Division to your rescue!”

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This blog post was sponsored by Logic Roots to review their product(s). Please note that junegrace.com publishes posts from sponsors that may provide products and services and/or pay for placement, links, and reviews. June Grace only reviews products and services that are a good fit for the blog and hopes readers have the opportunity to learn about new brands. All opinions expressed are of the blog’s author, June Grace.

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Appetite

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The divorce stress diet typically consists of coffee, wine, bourbon {oh wait, is that last one just me?}, and some crackers every couple of days.

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The custody trial appetite? It’s like being pregnant and preparing for your 8th month, devouring every chip and brownie and doughnut and slice of pizza in sight.

Gearin’ up.

Our Little Bubble

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Sometimes when I daydream

My mind wanders to this place

Where we live in a bubble

Our own little world

Filled with our love, our lives, our kids

Everything we need to be happy

Missing from this bubble

Is the ominous presence of ex-spouses

Buzzing in the background of our lives

We wouldn’t be who we are today without them

It’s how our families began, how our children came to be

But we’re always tied by them

Even though our bond to each other transcends it

When the clash of it all starts to weigh on me

And I feel tugs at my heart

I dream up our little world and hang out there awhile

Our bubble

Our trouble

Messy Mantra

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Life once seemed so simple

It was never easy, never dull

But simple

Grappling with the drama that’s been infused into my life

Despite my best efforts to deflect

It feels like my energy is wasted

Accept it, take it on, I tell myself

Adjust to it

Messy is your new reality

Like it or not, it’s yours

Here to stay, it’s not going anywhere

Possibly it could go from messy to super messy

Best case scenario

But the simplicity of marriage, of raising a child in one home has slipped beyond anyone’s grasp

Messy was what was always to come

Embracing it is likely the only way through

When you can’t run

Too Busy

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We live in a world where being busy can be so extreme that meeting all our commitments is literally impossible.

If only there were more hours in the day. If only our bodies didn’t need the restorative power of sleep. Yeah…

I used to think I was busy. I put my work obligations first because at that point in my life, when I was just starting out in my career, that was most important. Then I became a mom. I took it all in stride – I loved being a working mom and took pride in balancing it “all.”

It wasn’t until I received a complicated medical diagnosis that sucked up huge amounts of my time, energy, and well-being that I began to feel overwhelmed. I had no choice but to make changes in my life. I should probably make a lot more. Someday.

The fact is, we’re all busy. It’s the world we live in, combined in part with the expectations we hold for ourselves and the expectations of others.

Until we hold ourselves to a different standard, the cycle will perpetuate.

Kissy, Kissy – Why Modeling Affection Is Healthy for Kids

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Do you kiss your partner in front of your kids? I recently overheard a couple talking about how they don’t snuggle or hold hands in front of their kids and it made me feel kinda sad for them, and their kids.

How else are kids supposed to learn healthy models of affection between two loving adults?

When it comes to showing affection, such as giving hugs, snuggling, or holding hands, I want my son to know that expressing his emotions and showing affection for the people he loves is a good thing. It makes me happy to see him reach out and hug one of his buddies, or to watch him tell someone he cares about that he loves them.

Of course affection between kids is very different than affection between two adults, and children should never be made to feel excluded, but we can teach our children that too.

Children learn from what we teach them, but more than that, they learn from the behaviors they observe, what their parents model. Even when we think they aren’t paying attention, they usually are, and they pick up on subtle cues as well. Whether we are consciously aware of it or not, kids are always taking notes and emulating their parents and other adults they grow up around.

When I kiss my partner in front of the kids, in some ways it feels odd, because we are not married, we didn’t have children together, and yet, here are these kids (ours, but not ours) who look up to us. I hope they see two adults who love each other and express their care and emotions in a healthy way.

Kissy, kissy.